Top takeaways from first round of 2019 NFL Draft

The first round of the 2019 NFL Draft offered us a ton of surprises. Did the New York Giants really take Daniel Jones with the sixth pick? Their division rivals in the NFC East, the Washington Redskins, seemed to hit a home run with fellow quarterback Dwayne Haskins at the midway point of Round 1.

Meanwhile, the Buffalo Bills and Oakland Raiders went in different directions along the defensive line — one getting a true stud and the other reaching big time.

It seems like Arizona Cardinals general manager Steve Keim admitted his mistake from a year ago by taking Kyler Murray at No. 1. And remaining in the NFC West, the San Francisco 49ers added the draft’s best player.

These are among the top takeaways from the first round of the 2019 NFL Draft.

Matt Patricia turning Lions into Patriots 2.0 

We’re not going to sit back and say this is a bad thing. It isn’t. After signing former Patriots defensive end Trey Flowers to a massive contract last month, Patricia and the Lions went back to the well again on Thursday. The former Patriots assistant selected Iowa tight end T.J. Hockenson with the No. 8 overall pick in the draft. Hockenson was the consensus No. 1 tight end in the draft and is seen as a freak of nature.

It’s rather clear that Detroit is trying to provide Matthew Stafford with the same type of weapons we’ve seen Tom Brady excel with in New England. In this case, it’s almost a carbon copy of Rob Gronkowksi. It should do wonders for Stafford and Co.

Raiders’ drama seemed to be real 

Jon Gruden and Co. were apparently looking to move up for either defensive tackle Quinnen Williams or edge-rusher Nick Bosa. The target area was the San Francisco 49ers at No. 2 overall. Instead, Oakland stood pat with the fourth pick and selected Clemson edge-rusher Clelin Ferrell.

While seen as a first-round prospect, Ferrell was nowhere near projected to go within the top 10, let alone the top five. In fact, Oakland selected him over fellow pass-rusher Josh Allen. It was a major reach at an area in the draft that teams must avoid reaches. It also lends credence to the idea that predraft drama in Oakland’s war room was real. Oakland then went running back Josh Jacobs with the second of its first-round picks before adding safety Johnathan Abram to close out Day 1. All three of these picks were reaches.

Bills get a real steal in Ed Oliver 

After seeing Oakland reach with Ferrell and the New York Giants come out of left field with their selection of Daniel Jones, Buffalo was able to add an elite player at a need position. A dominant figure at Houston, Oliver came under scrutiny leading up the draft. In no way does this mean the defensive tackle isn’t an elite-level talent.

It really seems that teams analyzed Oliver’s game too much. He proved to be overwhelming for college competition. He could be an instant Pro Bowl performer. After rumors persisted that Buffalo might move into the top three for fellow defensive tackle Quinnen Williams, the team added a value pick a nine.

Washington quiets critics for now 

It was being reported in the lead-up to the draft that Washington was potentially looking to trade up for Daniel Jones. In fact, there seemed to be some disagreement between members of the front office. Had owner Daniel Snyder taken over the big board? Apparently not. Standing pat at 15 overall, Washington was able to land the consensus No. 2 quarterback in the draft in the form of Ohio State’s Dwayne Haskins.

This represents a major coup for Washington, especially given the injury issues this team is facing in the quarterback room. The Skins didn’t have to move up for Haskins. Instead, they saw him fall right on to their lap. That’s just great for a much-maligned front office.

49ers building a bully 

Most fans in Northern California were pleading for general manager John Lynch and Co. not to overthink this. Selecting No. 2 overall, San Francisco was in position to land the draft’s best overall player. Once the Cardinals picked Kyler Murray at one, this became a reality.

In the end, these 49ers nabbed Ohio State edge-rusher Nick Bosa to team up with recently acquired Pro Bowler Dee Ford on the outside. Add in another Pro Bowler in that of DeForest Buckner at defensive tackle, and this front seven is absolutely stacked. That’s a good thing with Murray, Russell Wilson and Jared Goff in the NFC West.

Panthers ignore glaring offensive tackle need

Florida State edge-rusher Brian Burns could very well be a dynamo at the next level. In no way does this mean that continuing to ignore pass protection in front of often-hobbled former NFL MVP Cam Newton is a recipe for success.

Alabama’s Jonah Williams was off the board when Carolina selected 16th overall. Even then, two other offensive tackles were selected almost immediately after the Panthers’ pick. It just make no real sense for Carolina to continue ignoring pass protection in front of Newton. It’s that simple.

We’re not sure what the Giants are doing

New York wasn’t interested in drafting a quarterback until it was. David Gettleman and Co. didn’t show much confidence in Haskins or Murray before meeting with them. In the end, these Giants made the most eye-opening move of the first round in selecting Duke’s quarterback Daniel Jones No. 6 overall.

It even led to Haskins laughing in the green room. Jones is seen as a major project and likely won’t be ready to start for two more seasons. Then with the 17th pick — acquired in the Odell Beckham Jr. trade — New York went defensive tackle in the form of Dexter Lawrence. That’s one way to get help for Jones and reigning NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year Saquon Barkley on offense. Ouch!

Some curious moves from the Packers

Former Michigan standout pass-rusher Rashan Gary didn’t seem to be need for Green Bay after the team added edge-rushers Za’Darius Smith and Preston Smith in free agency. Add in injury concerns to Gary, and it was a surprise at No. 12 overall.

With their second pick of Day 1 — acquired in a trade with the Saints last year — the Packers picked up a fast-rising safety in the form of Darnell Savage. This was also a curious move from general manager Brian Gutekunst and Co. It’s obviously too early to draw conclusions here. But the Packers went with two boom-or-bust prospects.

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The Greatest NFL Quarterbacks Of All Time

30. Phil Simms

Sports Illustrated once called Phil Simms the most underrated NFL quarterback of all time, and it’s a fair argument. Even with the career of Eli Manning, who has broken nearly all of Simms’ team records, many still consider him the greatest passer in New York Giants history.

Simms led the Giants to two Super Bowl wins but only went to two Pro Bowls and was an All-Pro selection just once. Even if his yearly stats weren’t too astounding — he only topped 4,000 passing yards once and never surpassed 22 touchdowns — his performance in 1987’s Super Bowl XXI is the stuff of legend. He completed 88 percent of his passes (22 of 25) and had a passer rating of 150.9, arguably the best performance by any QB in Super Bowl history.

11 NOV 1989: NEW YORK GIANTS QUARTERBACK PHIL SIMMS LOOKS TO THE SIDELINES DURING THEIR 31-7 WIN OVER THE LOS ANGELES RAMS AT ANAHEIM STADIUM IN ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA. Mandatory Credit: Mike Powell/ALLSPORT

29. Randall Cunningham

A true revolutionary at the quarterback position, Randall Cunningham could basically do it all.

In terms of passing, his career numbers are right there with some Hall of Famers from the same era in the ’80s and ’90s but it was with his legs that Cunningham separated himself from the pack. He broke virtually every record for rushing at the quarterback position and averaged 30.6 rushing yards per game, which is still second all-time among QBs.

His postseason record is suspect but he also didn’t have the luxury of getting much protection up front, as only two other NFL players were ever sacked more times than Cunningham.

10 Jan 1999: Quarterback Randall Cunningham #7 of the Minnesota Vikings in action during the NFC Play Offs Game against the Arizona Cardinals at the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The Vikings defeated the Cardinals 41-21.

28. Troy Aikman

If winning big games was everything, Troy Aikman would be much higher on this list. He won three Super Bowls with the Dallas Cowboys, never losing once in the title game. Aikman was also a six-time Pro Bowler, but was an All-Pro only once, which is the higher honor. Aikman was arguably the quarterback of the ’90s, playing from 1989 to 2000 and racking up 90 wins in that decade, which was more than any other QB.

Aikman earned his spot in the Pro Football Hall of Fame because of his ability to lead a great team but his individual statistics were never too impressive, as he never topped 3,445 yards and only threw for more than 20 touchdowns one time.

15 Oct 1995: Quarterback Troy Aikman #8 of the Dallas Cowboys throws a pass during their game against the San Diego Chargers at Jack Murphy Stadium in San Diego, California. The Cowboys defeated the Chargers 23-9. Mandatory Credit: Al Bello/Allsport

27. Sid Luckman

One of the first great quarterbacks in pro football history, Luckman led the Chicago Bears to four NFL championships from 1939 to 1950.

He also led the league in passing yards, passing touchdowns and passer rating three times, being named a first team All-Pro five times. Luckman revolutionized the throwing game, passing for seven touchdowns in a game once, a record that still hasn’t been topped even in today’s pass-heavy league — and he was the first guy to ever throw for 400 yards in a game.

Nearly 70 years after he played his final NFL snap, Luckman still ranks second all-time in yards per pass attempt.

Bear Flipper Sid Luckman, former Columbia star and now with Chicago Bears, does some practice passing at Polo Grounds for Sunday’s tussle with Jints. (Photo By: /NY Daily News via Getty Images)

26. Ken Anderson

Before legendary coach Bill Walsh went on to make Joe Montana into an icon with his West Coast Offense in San Francisco, Walsh ran it with quarterback Ken Anderson in Cincinnati.

Anderson spent 16 seasons in the NFL, all with the Bengals, and put up some spectacular numbers along the way, including four seasons where he led the league in passer rating. His accuracy was also never questioned, as he posted a career 59.3 completion percentage and retired in 1986 with the records for single-season completion percentage and single-game completion percentage.

Anderson has largely been overlooked in these discussions because he played in a small market and never won a Super Bowl but he was a successful guinea pig for a system that would launch several star QBs.

2 Sep 1984: Cincinnati Bengals quarterback Ken Anderson throws a pass during game against the Denver Bronos at Mile High Stadium in Denver, Colorado. The Broncos won the game 20-17. Mandatory Credit: Allsport /Allsport

25. Terry Bradshaw

Pittsburgh Steelers lifer Terry Bradshaw benefited greatly from being surrounded by Hall-of-Fame offensive skill players and one of the greatest defenses in history. He never led the league in passing yards or passer rating — and his career total for both of those stats won’t blow you away — but he never lost in the big games. He guided the Steelers to four Super Bowls and won every one of them.

You can knock Bradshaw for throwing nearly as many interceptions as touchdowns in his career, but with that defense backing him up, who can blame him for taking some risks?

Pittsburgh Steelers’ quarterback Terry Bradshaw prepares to throw a pass to one of his fellow teammates.

24. Tony Romo

It might shock you to know that, among all retired NFL quarterbacks, Tony Romo has the highest career passer rating. It’s also the highest career passer rating for any QB who never played in a Super Bowl, which is the part of Romo’s legacy that may keep him out of the Hall of Fame.

He never had much luck in the playoffs but his career numbers in statistics like yards per pass attempt and completion percentage — he ties Peyton Manning in the latter category — are among the best ever. In roughly the same number of seasons, Romo’s numbers are better than fellow Cowboys great Troy Aikman, but he had the misfortune of playing without the Hall of Famers his predecessor did.

ARLINGTON, TX – JANUARY 04: Tony Romo #9 of the Dallas Cowboys gestures against the Detroit Lions during the second half of their NFC Wild Card Playoff game at AT&T Stadium on January 4, 2015 in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)

23. Jim Kelly

For eight out of 11 of his NFL seasons, Jim Kelly passed for at least 3,000 yards and averaged about 3,200 yards per season for his career. He also led the Buffalo Bills to the Super Bowl four times, which means he made it to the big game in more than one-third of all the seasons he played. Of course, the Bills lost all four times and Kelly didn’t play at his best in them, but he clearly had a gift for winning in the regular season and playoffs.

12 Nov 1995: Jim Kelly #12 of the Buffalo Bills gets ready to pass the ball during the game against the Atlanta Falcons at the Rich Stadium in Orchard Park, New York. The Bills defeated the Falcons 23-17.

22. Warren Moon

After unequaled success in the Canadian Football League, where he won five championships, Warren Moon went on to have a great career in the NFL despite having virtually no playoff success.

Moon threw for more than 3,000 yards every time he played a 16-game season and topped the 4,000-yard mark four times. Moon’s gun-slinging style led to a fair share of interceptions and an average career passer rating but he was extremely popular, being named to nine Pro Bowls. Moon currently sits at 10th all-time in NFL career passing yards and 10th all-time in game-winning drives led.

If he hadn’t spent six years playing in the CFL, it’s scary to think what his final NFL totals would’ve been.

ATLANTA, GA – CIRCA 1980’s: Quarterback Warren Moon #1 of the Houston Oilers throws a pass against the Atlanta Falcons during a mid circa 1980’s NFL football game at Atlanta Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia. Moon played for the Oilers from 1984-93. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images)

21. Sonny Jurgensen

Arguably the league’s earliest long-ball passer, Jurgensen was a legend with the Eagles and Redskins who posted a career losing record as a starter but was still a marvel. He led the league in passing yardage five times, topping 3,000 yards in all those seasons, and was a touchdown machine. His 255 career passing touchdowns total still put him at 19th all-time, despite playing during the so-called “dead-ball era,” when running backs ruled the league.

While with the Eagles in 1960, he won his lone NFL championship, handing Vince Lombardi’s Packers their only playoff loss ever.

Hall of Fame quarterback Sonny Jurgensen (9) of the Washington Redskins looks for an open receiver during the Redskins 14-3 victory over the Detroit Lions on December 15, 1968 at D.C. Stadium in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Nate Fine/NFL) *** Local Caption ***

20. Donovan McNabb

Severely overlooked because he never won the big game, Eagles legend Donovan McNabb is one of only four quarterbacks in NFL history to collect 30,000 passing yards, 200 passing touchdowns, 3,000 rushing yards and 20 rushing touchdowns — and all of them are on this list.

He’s tied with Jim Kelly as the QB with the most playoff wins with no ring and finished his career with more passing yards and a better passer rating than that Hall of Famer. In 2004, McNabb had one of the greatest seasons a quarterback has ever had, becoming the first ever to throw for more than 30 touchdowns and less than 10 interceptions. For some reason, he’s still not in the Hall.

ARLINGTON, TX – JANUARY 03: Quarterback Donovan McNabb #5 of the Philadelphia Eagles throws against the Dallas Cowboys at Cowboys Stadium on January 3, 2010 in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)

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Josh Norman: Taylor Lewan’s ‘ultimate disrespect’ sparked confrontation

Josh Norman is still fuming several days after his incident with Taylor Lewan.

The Redskins cornerback was involved in a confrontation with the Titans offensive lineman following Tennessee’s 25-16 victory over Washington on Saturday. Lewan went up to the Redskins’ sideline after the game went final and mocked Norman’s famous bow-and-arrow celebration, leading to Norman getting up in his face.

Addressing reporters Wednesday, Norman elaborated further on the skirmish.
“Maximum disrespect,” said Norman of Lewan’s actions, per Les Carpenter of the Washington Post. “Ultimate disrespect.
“I don’t care how big you are. You can be a giant; it’s kill or be killed,” the former All-Pro continued. “That’s how I look at it, how I see it. The guy had a whole foot and 135 pounds on me; what does that matter?”
As for what started the bad blood between the two players, Lewan claimed that Norman had tried to injure Titans running back Derrick Henry late in the game, something that Norman also responded to on Wednesday.
“How can [you] someone hurt someone who is 265 pounds?” said Norman, exaggerating Henry’s listed weight of 247. “He’s a running back. But what [Lewan] should have been worrying about… is his quarterback because our whole line ran through him like water on rocks. I mean, gosh, you would think he’d have been doing a better job worrying about protecting him than worrying about a running back who is [247] pounds.”
Norman is a player who has thrived off feuding with opponents in the past, and while his profile isn’t as high as it was a few years ago, it’s safe to say that his brand still hasn’t changed.

By: Daryn Albert

Original Article

Reuben Foster Claimed on Waivers by Redskins, Placed on Commissioner Exempt List

The Washington Redskins have claimed former San Francisco 49ers linebacker Reuben Foster off waivers, the team confirmed in a statement Tuesday. Foster was later placed on the Commissioner Exempt list the same day.

“The Redskins fully understand the severity of the recent allegations made against Reuben,” Senior Vice President of Player Personnel Doug Williams said in the statement. “If true, you can be sure these allegations are nothing our organization would ever condone. Let me be clear, Reuben will have to go through numerous steps including the full legal process, an investigation and potential discipline from the NFL, as well as meetings with counselors associated with the team before he will ever have the opportunity to wear the Burgundy and Gold as a player.”

The NFL announced Tuesday evening it was placing Foster on the Commissioner Exempt list and would continue to review the matter. Under the league’s personal conduct policy, Foster cannot attend games or practices. He can be present at the team’s facility for activities like workouts or meetings with the team’s permission.

Foster was arrested Saturday night at the team’s Tampa hotel, one day before the 49ers’ game against the Buccaneers, on charges of domestic violence. The 49ers released Foster Sunday morning. It remains unknown if the NFL will suspend Foster.

Williams also said that the team decided to claim Foster after having “candid conversations” with some of his “ex-Alabama teammates and current Redskins players who were overwhelmingly supportive of us taking this chance.”

Saturday’s arrest wasn’t Foster’s first since being drafted with the No. 31 overall pick in 2017.

The second-year linebacker was arrested twice in a one-month span during the offseason. He was charged with marijuana possession in January and “charges related to domestic violence” in February. The latter charges were dropped when Foster’s accuser recanted her story. Foster was suspended for the first two games of 2018 due to the arrests.

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By: Jenna West

Alex Smith will undergo surgery for broken tibia, fibula

The bad injury news about Alex Smith has been confirmed.

Redskins head coach Jay Gruden said after Washington’s 23-21 loss to Houston on Sunday that Smith suffered a broken tibia and fibula and will undergo surgery.

Smith was tackled on a sack in the third quarter and had his leg visibly broken. He was in clear pain and had to be carted off the field with his leg in a cast.

Smith, 34, signed a four-year, $94 million contract with Washington that includes $71 million guaranteed. While he will be out for the rest of the season, he may be able to recover and rehab in time to play next season.

The veteran QB had 10 touchdown passes on the season and had Washington in first place in the division at the time of his injury.

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By: Larry Brown Sports

Winners and losers from NFL Week 11

From thrilling last-second wins by teams that are fighting to stay in contention to a horrifying injury that could shape the NFC playoff race, NFL Week 11 had it all.

A six-game winning streak was snapped in agonizing fashion. A team many thought would contend for the title suffered a sixth-straight loss. A team many thought was out of contention is right back in it thanks to a second-straight road win.

Those are among the biggest winners and losers from NFL Week 11.

Winner: Captain Andrew Luck has Colts on a roll

© Trevor Ruszkowski-USA TODAY Sports

The Indianapolis Colts lost five of their first six games this season. It looked like Andrew Luck’s redemption tour was going to be delayed by a year, at least, despite some solid play from him early. But since that awful start, both Luck and the Colts have started playing some outstanding ball.

With 297 yards and three passing touchdowns Sunday in a 38-10 blowout win over the Tennessee Titans, Luck extended his streak of at least three passing touchdowns to seven consecutive games.

His Colts have now rattled off four wins in a row and are in second place in the AFC South, knocking at the door to get into the playoffs. Should they complete the comeback and make the postseason, then Luck deserves to be included in the MVP conversation, along with Comeback Player of the Year.

Loser: Washington suffers déjà vu in worst possible way

© Brad Mills-USA TODAY Sports Nov 18, 2018; Landover, MD, USA; Washington Redskins quarterback Alex Smith (11) reacts after breaking his leg in the second half against the Houston Texans during the second half at FedEx Field. 

Thirty-three years ago to the day, the Washington Redskins were issued a staggering gut punch. Joe Theismann suffered a horrifying broken leg that is still to this day considered among the most gruesome in professional sports.

On Sunday, Washington lost Alex Smith in the same exact manner. He broke his right tibia and fibula while being dragged to the ground on a sack. He was carted off, taken to the hospital in an ambulance and required immediate surgery. To nobody’s surprise, he will miss the rest of the season, head coach Jay Gruden announced after the game.

Washington also lost Sunday’s game in heartbreaking fashion — falling to 6-4 on the season. The team will be bringing in a bunch of veterans on Monday to see who might back up Colt McCoy.

Barring some crazy developments, it’s hard to see this team finishing off the season strong without Smith. Though it still leads the NFC East, Washington will be hard pressed to hold that lead. On the season, it is minus-one in point differential and closes out the campaign with four of its last six games on the road.

Winner: Cowboys rising 

© Brett Davis-USA TODAY Sports Nov 18, 2018; Atlanta, GA, USA; Dallas Cowboys running back Ezekiel Elliott (21) celebrates with teammates after a touchdown run against the Atlanta Falcons in the fourth quarter at Mercedes-Benz Stadium. 

Dallas couldn’t win on the road earlier this year and entered Week 9 with a 3-5 record. It looked like the ‘Boys were headed for another disappointing season. But the past two weeks have seen this team come together for two straight road wins, and Sunday’s victory in Atlanta was very impressive.

Ezekiel Elliott and the big guys up front are getting back to dominating folks at the line of scrimmage. The dynamic dual-threat running back followed up Week 10’s 187-yard game with an incredible 201-yard showing against the Falcons.

Now just one game behind Washington in the NFC East, featuring an offense that’s starting to click and a defense that can really get after folks — and with four of their final six games at home — Dallas is in great shape to win the division.

Loser: Jags are toast

© Reinhold Matay-USA TODAY Sports Nov 18, 2018; Jacksonville, FL, USA; Pittsburgh Steelers inside linebacker Jon Bostic (51) brings down Jacksonville Jaguars running back Leonard Fournette (27) during the second half at TIAA Bank Field.

The Jacksonville Jaguars gave it their all on Sunday. For a while it appeared they had Big Ben Roethlisberger and Co. in the palm of their hands, as the Pittsburgh Steelers could do next to nothing in the first half.

Despite a monster game from Leonard Fournette. Despite two Jalen Ramsey interceptions against Big Ben, and three interceptions overall. Despite the best showing Jacksonville has put up in weeks. The Jags lost. They lost their sixth game in a row. They’re now 3-7 on the season. Oh, by the way, Blake Bortles is still not the guy.

This team is done. A franchise many pegged to represent the AFC in Super Bowl LIII is unofficially out of the playoff chase, and it is officially the biggest disappointment of the 2018 season.

All the Winner and Losers

By: Jesse Reed

The 10 craziest things about Week 10, the craziest Sunday of the 2018 NFL season

Week 10 of the 2018 NFL season was the wildest of the year, with stunning upsets, unbelievable records and the Bills scoring 41 points. Here are the 10 craziest facts from a wild football Sunday. 

1. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers became the first team in NFL history to gain more than 425 yards from scrimmage while scoring three points or less. And the Bucs went WAY over 425, netting 501 yards in an ugly 16-3 loss to the Redskins. How does that happen? Tampa had the ball in Washington’s red zone five times, missed two field goals and turned over the ball four times.

Prior to Sunday, there had only been one game ever in which a team gained over 400 yards and scored so few points and that team – the 2011 Rams – had 424. (It’s rare enough to find a team netting 300 yards and failing to get more than three points. It’s only happened 99 times in history.) This year, teams gaining 500 yards from scrimmage average 35 points per game.

2. The Bills scored more points on Sunday (41) than they did in the entire month of October (37). This next stat is even more amazing but lacks the punchy conciseness of the former: Since Sept. 24, the Bills had scored 46 points in total. That was over six games too, without any byes wrecking the curve. Forty-six in six and 41 in one. Amazing. And here’s one more, because we can’t get enough stats indirectly indicting the historic awfulness of ex-Bills starter Nathan Peterman: In a span of just over 16 minutes on Sunday, Buffalo scored more points (24) than it had in the previous three games combined.

3. Since avenging their AFC championship game loss to the Patriots in Week 2, moving to 2-0 on the season, the mega-hyped Jacksonville Jaguars have lost six of seven, with their only win coming against the team that just lost to the Bills by 31 points.

4. With a second-quarter touchdown pass in Sunday’s win over the Cardinals, Patrick Mahomes broke a 54-year-old Kansas City Chiefs record for touchdown passes in a season. (Hall of Famer Len Dawson held the mark with 30 TDs in 1964.) It should go without saying, but we’ll do it anyway, that this was only the Chiefs 10th game of the season. Somehow, the electric, MVP shoo-in is six touchdowns behind Peyton Manning’s record 55-touchdown pace of 2013, which only further proves how amazing that season was.

5. It took some missed field goals by Tampa’s Chandler Catanzaro to keep it alive, but on Sunday the Redskins extended one of the more unbelievable streaks in NFL history. In Washington’s six wins, the team has never trailed. In their three losses, they’ve never had a lead. The team that scores first has never relinquished their lead. How rare is it for a team to make it nine games without a single lead change? It’s been 64 years since the odd feat was accomplished, coincidentally by the same Redskins franchise. The difference that year was that the ‘Skins went 2-7 and usually got down so quickly that a lead change was never on the table. This year, Washington has outscored opponents by a single point, making the lack of flip-flop games all the more surprising.

Full List Here

By: Chris Chase

Winners and losers from NFL Week 7

If we’re being honest, there was a ton of really bad football on display during the action in NFL Week 7.

We should have seen it coming, though, after what transpired as NFL Network reporter Melissa Stark was previewing the London game.

Thankfully some outstanding performances did take place, somewhat balancing out the scales. But overall, Week 7 was one many players and teams would rather forget.

With that in mind, let’s dive into the biggest winners and losers.

Alex Smith Traded To Redskins

Written Charean Williams at ProFootballTalk.com

Alex Smith doesn’t have to wonder about his future any longer, and Washington no longer has to wonder who its quarterback will be in 2018.

The Chiefs reached an agreement to trade Smith to Washington, Terez Paylor of the Kansas City Star reports. There is no word on the compensation the Chiefs will receive.

Although the trade cannot be consummated until the first day of the league year, which begins March 14, Paylor reports the sides have agreed to the deal.

Smith was entering the final year of his deal, with a cap number of $20.6 million for 2018. The Chiefs will save $17 million on their cap.

It paves the way for Patrick Mahomes to take over as the starting quarterback in Kansas City. It also assures that Kirk Cousins will enter free agency after Washington used the franchise tag on him in consecutive years.

Kirk Cousins is Dedicated to Washington. Is Management Dedicated to him?

Written by Cody Benjamin at CBS Sports.com

Kirk Cousins’ career with the Washington Redskins has seemingly been as much about his debated worth to his team as his actual performance on the field.

How else do you explain the annual discussions of whether Washington should — or will — commit to Cousins for more than a single season at a time? And when the Redskins are yet again clawing for life as the latter portion of the season arrives, things like Cousins’ long-term future in D.C. seem just as pressing as the team’s current attempts to avoid a full-blown collapse.

Cousins, however, would tell you he’s got his sights set on sticking in Washington.

That’s according to Alex Duke, who profiled the quarterback for The Gospel Coalition and said Cousins is “fully invested in the present goal of getting the Redskins to the Super Bowl in 2018 or beyond.”

A Super Bowl might be a long shot for Washington (4-6) this time around, especially with the NFC East-leading Philadelphia Eagles at 9-1 and having already swept Cousins’ club, but even as his second straight franchise tag expires following 2017, the veteran appears committed to the same organization that’s failed to ink him to a long-term deal.

“I want to be a diligent, hard-working, humble, and servant-hearted employee of the Redskins and teammate with the guys I play with,” Cousins told Duke.

And when the time comes for Cousins to move on, perhaps away from the game of football itself? Duke says the Redskins quarterback is already considering an array of occupations.

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