NFL stars who could be traded during the 2019 draft

The NFL Draft is when the league meets its newest young stars. As for those already established, some of them may find new homes too.

Here are 12 veterans who could be traded during the 2019 NFL Draft:

Derek Carr

Most of the signs point to the Raiders keeping their young quarterback. For one, the team staged Antonio Brown meeting the signal-caller at Carr’s house. That would be all for not if Oakland now deals Carr. Every other move this offseason — signing Tyrell Williams and Trent Brown — has also been made under the assumption the Raiders already have their quarterback in place. But Raiders general manager Mike Mayock is sending mixed signals. He said, “we love Derek (Carr)” and yet has also repeated that the Raiders will “do all of our due diligence” at quarterback like every other position. It sounds like if the quarterback Mayock and Jon Gruden really like in the draft is available to them, Carr could be gone.

Leonard Fournette

Trade rumors were circling the third-year running back in January after executive vice president Tom Coughlin criticized Fournette for his actions on the team’s sideline during the season finale. The two sides appeared to make up, but then on April 11 police arrested Fournette for speeding and “knowingly driving with a suspended license.” Coach Doug Marrone told the media on April 16 that Fournette will not face team discipline for the arrest. Apparently, he’s ready to let the incident blow over, but will the front office feel the same way if a team offers the Jaguars an interesting deal for Fournette at the draft?

Tyreek Hill

Similar to Fournette, Hill is facing off-the-field problems this offseason that could jeopardize his tenure with his current team. Hill’s situation, though, is a lot more dire. Police are currently investigating Hill’s connection with two incidents of suspected child abuse. This is an extremely complicated situation because even if Hill isn’t charged with a crime, he could face a suspension.  The Chiefs didn’t waste any time dumping Kareem Hunt last fall, and it’s worth wondering if they might garner a trade for the speedster at the draft. The Athletic’s Jay Glazer reported that Hill was at the center of trade talks during the NFL combine, but if a trade is done now, Kansas City would be getting pennies on the dollar for Hill, who, in addition to possibly facing a suspension, wants a new contract.

Frank Clark

The Seahawks placed the franchise tag on Clark this offseason, but despite the possibility of making some $17 million in 2019, Clark has threatened to hold out if he doesn’t receive a long-term agreement. No team wants a Le’Veon Bell situation, and the Seahawks would like to avoid the Earl Thomas distraction they had last year too. This could lead to Clark getting traded at the draft, although as of April 14 Jay Glazer reported trade talks for Clark had “died down.”

Jack Doyle

The Colts tight end posted career bests in 2017, recording 80 receptions for 690 yards and four touchdowns. But then with the arrival of Eric Ebron in 2018, Doyle saw his targets decrease from 7.2 per game to 5.5 each contest. Doyle also missed 10 games because of injury, which led to him catching only 26 passes for 245 yards and two touchdowns in 2018. If the Colts are comfortable with Ebron and Mo Alie-Cox at tight end, they could shop Doyle at the draft.

Josh Rosen

Although technically not a star yet, Rosen qualifies for our list because he was the No. 10 overall pick a year ago. Rosen threw for 2,278 yards, 11 touchdowns and 14 interceptions while averaging 5.8 yards per attempt as a rookie in 2018. As of right now, there’s no telling whether Rosen is truly going to develop into a star or not because he had little help with the Cardinals last year. It might not matter, though, as Arizona is rumored to be selecting quarterback Kyler Murray at No. 1 overall. If that happens, Rosen will be one of the hottest topics during the first round of the draft.

Duke Johnson

The Browns seemed to like the idea of three strong backs on the depth chart after they signed Kareem Hunt, but Johnson apparently wants no part of it. On April 8 Johnson requested to be traded, according to cleveland.com. Johnson has also refused to show up to the beginning of Cleveland’s offseason program. The best time for the Browns to address this issue is during the draft with a trade.

A.J. Green

Trading Green would almost guarantee the Bengals will finish in the AFC North cellar, but with Cincinnati seemingly in rebuilding mode, dealing the seven-time Pro Bowler is not the worst idea. Green turns 31 this summer and hasn’t been able to finish two of the last three years because of injuries. In 2018 he recorded 46 catches for 694 yards and six touchdowns in nine games.  Because of the injuries, his value is already on the downswing. It might be wise to embrace a full rebuild and see what value Green has on the trade market.

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By: Dave Holcomb

Chiefs OL Jeff Allen is doing something awesome for a homeless fan who helped him

Kansas City Chiefs guard Jeff Allen had an issue while trying to get to Saturday’s wild-card game in Kansas City – his car got stuck in the snow.
But then something awesome happened as a stranger jumped in to help, which led to a great story:

Thanks to the power of Twitter, Dave was found:

And it gets even more special:

Dave will now get to have a day he’ll never forget next Sunday, as he’ll be at Arrowhead cheering on his Chiefs as they take on the Patriots in the AFC title game.

It’s always great to be reminded that there are good people on this planet and Dave and Jeff Allen are certainly two of those people.

Original Article

By: Andy Nesbitt

Winners and losers from the Divisional Round of the 2019 NFL playoffs

The Divisional Round of the NFL playoffs got underway Saturday night with the AFC’s top-seeded Kansas City Chiefs in action against the Indianapolis Colts. A week off did nothing to slow the Chiefs’ offensive momentum.

Led by Patrick Mahomes, who did not find his first career playoff start nearly as intimidating as the pundits thought he would, the Chiefs jumped out to a 24-7 lead in the first half, and never looked back. The Colts hardly looked ready to play, nothing like the team that rode a 10-1 streak into the weekend. The Chiefs went on to win by a final score of 31-13.

The Cowboys and Rams met in LA for the late game on Saturday night to decide the first of the NFC Championship entrants. The Rams’ running game had no troubles against a usually stout Cowboys defense, and the home team rolled on for a 30-22 win.

On Sunday, the Patriots had no problems running around and through the Chargers, winning 41-28 to lock down their eighth consecutive appearance in the AFC Championship game.

The Saints turned aside the Eagles, sinking their hope of a Super Bowl repeat with a 20-14 win in New Orleans. The Saints will host the Rams there next weekend.

Winner: Michael Thomas

The postseason hasn’t been filled with inspiring performances from offensive skill players. But the Saints wide receiver changed that. He and Drew Brees single-handedly got the Saints offense rolling again after a slow start. His best catch of the day — and there were A LOT of them — was on the Saints’ go-ahead touchdown in the third quarter. Just watch it.

https://twitter.com/NFL/status/1084599206159908864

He finished the game with 171 yards and a touchdown on 12 catches.

Loser: Nick Foles’ magic

You can’t impugn what the guy did prior to this game. The Eagles wouldn’t have been playing this weekend, or last, if Foles hadn’t stepped up as the team’s “closer” again this season with Carson Wentz hurt. But he turned into a pumpkin again, underthrowing his receivers and just unable to get the ball to his receivers when the Eagles needed it the most.

With free agency looming this spring, Foles may have cost himself some money with his performance this week, maybe not much, but enough to notice.

Winner: Time of possession

It feels like we haven’t had a good conversation about time of possession since the early days of the Chip Kelly experience in Philly. This time it was the Saints putting on the clock clinic.

It happened in the third quarter. Trailing 10-14, the Saints got the ball at their own 8-yard line. From there they put together a grinding 92-yard touchdown drive over 18 plays and 11:29 minutes, essentially monopolizing the entire third quarter.

Winner: The Patriots defense

Absent most of the season, the Patriots defense looked like one of the NFL’s most fearsome in the first half of the game. Philip Rivers never had a chance against a pass rush that was previously dormant.

Loser: Philip Rivers’ legacy

He’s got more yards, more touchdowns and fewer interceptions over the course of his career than either Eli Manning or Ben Roethlisberger, but unlike those other two first-round picks from the 2004 draft, he does not have a Super Bowl ring. Instead, he and J.P. Losman have something in common.

Winner: Patriots running backs

The Chargers defense put on a clinic for how to stop a creative running game in last week’s win against the Ravens. Apparently, Patriots OC Josh McDaniels was able to find some holes in their game plan.

Sony Michel rolled up nearly 100 yards and scored three touchdowns … in the first half. He’s the first rookie running back in franchise history to rush for more than 100 yards in a playoff game. He finished the day with 129 yards and three touchdowns on 24 carries.

James White, who led the team in receptions during the regular season with 87, was Tom Brady’s favorite receiver on the day, catching 15 of 17 passes for 97 yards.

The Patriots chewed up the clock with their running backs, leaving little time for Rivers and Co. to put points on the board. It also helped keep the workload light for their defense, and teased out what their game plan might be next week against Kansas City.

Winner: C.J. Anderson

The Rams signed C.J. Anderson in mid-December, when Todd Gurley was dealing with a knee injury. Anderson had been released by both the Panthers and Raiders earlier in the season and was really just supposed to be a warm body while Gurley could heal up.

Instead, Anderson has bulldozed every defense he faced. In two games to end the season, he carried the ball 43 times for 299 yards and two touchdowns — that averaged out to 7 yards per carry. But that was against two of the worst teams in the NFL, the Cardinals and 49ers. Next up was the playoffs — and a Cowboys defense that ranked fifth in the league against the run during the regular season. Last week, they held the Seahawks’ top-ranked rushing offense to just 73 yards on the ground.

Anderson had more than that in the first half alone: 12 carries for 78 yards. Even with a healthy Gurley back in the lineup, Anderson was a force in the Rams’ first playoff win in 14 years. He used his, uh, rotund frame to help the Rams dominate the time of possession and scored what proved to be the game-winning touchdown.

Anderson was the leading rusher with 123 yards and two touchdowns. Plus, he did this:

All the Winners and Losers here

 

 

Which top NFL playoff team is at biggest risk of divisional-round upset?

An upset alert shouldn’t be necessary to make the top-seeded teams in the NFL playoffs aware of the imminent threat facing them this weekend.

Three of the four outfits that advanced from last week’s wild-card round, after all, did so on the road. And only once this decade (in 2015) have the top two seeds on each side advanced to the conference championship games.

But while this weekend’s traveling teams collectively posted a 18-14 mark as visitors this season, the foursome of teams hosting after a first-round bye (the Kansas City Chiefs, New England Patriots, New Orleans Saints and Los Angeles Rams) combined for a 28-4 record at home.

In light of that, we asked our NFL experts: Which team coming off a first-round bye is at the biggest risk of falling in a divisional-round upset?

Nancy Armour

I love Patrick Mahomes and everything he’s done for the Chiefs this season, and would like to think he’s going to be the one to end Kansas City’s long, long, long history of playoff heartbreak. Especially against the Indianapolis Colts. But until it actually happens, I can’t ignore the karma. Kansas City has lost 10 of its last 11 playoff games – that one victory came against Brian Hoyer and the Houston Texans – and is 0-4 against Indianapolis in the postseason. That includes the most crushing loss of all, the 2013 wild-card game in which Kansas City blew a 28-point lead and lost 45-44. Mahomes and Andy Reid have said all the right things this week, but I’m going to have to see it to believe it.

Jarrett Bell

The Chiefs. After watching all three quarterbacks who made their playoff debuts last weekend lose, that’s not a good omen for projected MVP Patrick Mahomes. No, the NFL-record 6 consecutive playoff home losses by KC isn’t on Mahomes…who wasn’t even born the last time the home team won in the playoffs at Arrowhead. But there’s just something spooky about that. Add Capt. Andrew Luck maybe carving up a suspect Chiefs defense, and I think we might see this No. 1 seed bite the dust. Of course, Mr. 50 Touchdowns has spent an entire season proving doubters wrong. And on a personal note, Andy Reid has made me look foolish multiple times when picking against him. But to borrow phrasing from my former colleague, Gordon Forbes, I just can’t shake the feeling KC’s season is about to be BBQ’d.

Nate Davis

Maybe the question for the bye week playoff teams should be, “Who’s not at risk?” All of them feel fairly vulnerable to me with the exception of New Orleans. But maybe the Rams are in the most jeopardy. Their “home” game threatens to be overrun by Cowboys fans and a team that seems well-equipped to pull off the upset at the L.A. Coliseum, where the Rams lost their wild-card contest to the Falcons a year ago. Dallas just locked down Seattle’s top-ranked ground game and will next face Todd Gurley, who’s probably going to be less than 100% after a knee issue forced him to miss two games. More worrisome, as much talent as the Rams defense has, it surrendered a league-worst 5.1 yards per carry … and is now tasked with slowing league rushing champ Zeke Elliott and highly mobile QB Dak Prescott? Gulp.

Jori Epstein

The Rams. The Cowboys’ top-5 run D is riding momentum after holding the Seahawks – 160 yards per game in the regular season – to 73 in a wildcard win. Rams all-pro running back Todd Gurley, on the other hand, is returning from nearly a month on the sideline with knee inflammation and soreness. Dallas will have its hand full containing an offense that’s averaged 37.1 points at their home Coliseum. Dak Prescott, too, must take care not to turn over the ball. But if the team follows the blueprint it used to hold the ball 9:40 more than the Seahawks last week, Ezekiel Elliott can capitalize on a Rams defense allowing a league-worst 5.1 yards per carry. Add in the star-studded Cowboys fans expected to line the Coliseum? Dallas upsets a young L.A. offense to reach its first NFC Championship Game in 23 years.

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The 10 craziest things about Week 10, the craziest Sunday of the 2018 NFL season

Week 10 of the 2018 NFL season was the wildest of the year, with stunning upsets, unbelievable records and the Bills scoring 41 points. Here are the 10 craziest facts from a wild football Sunday. 

1. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers became the first team in NFL history to gain more than 425 yards from scrimmage while scoring three points or less. And the Bucs went WAY over 425, netting 501 yards in an ugly 16-3 loss to the Redskins. How does that happen? Tampa had the ball in Washington’s red zone five times, missed two field goals and turned over the ball four times.

Prior to Sunday, there had only been one game ever in which a team gained over 400 yards and scored so few points and that team – the 2011 Rams – had 424. (It’s rare enough to find a team netting 300 yards and failing to get more than three points. It’s only happened 99 times in history.) This year, teams gaining 500 yards from scrimmage average 35 points per game.

2. The Bills scored more points on Sunday (41) than they did in the entire month of October (37). This next stat is even more amazing but lacks the punchy conciseness of the former: Since Sept. 24, the Bills had scored 46 points in total. That was over six games too, without any byes wrecking the curve. Forty-six in six and 41 in one. Amazing. And here’s one more, because we can’t get enough stats indirectly indicting the historic awfulness of ex-Bills starter Nathan Peterman: In a span of just over 16 minutes on Sunday, Buffalo scored more points (24) than it had in the previous three games combined.

3. Since avenging their AFC championship game loss to the Patriots in Week 2, moving to 2-0 on the season, the mega-hyped Jacksonville Jaguars have lost six of seven, with their only win coming against the team that just lost to the Bills by 31 points.

4. With a second-quarter touchdown pass in Sunday’s win over the Cardinals, Patrick Mahomes broke a 54-year-old Kansas City Chiefs record for touchdown passes in a season. (Hall of Famer Len Dawson held the mark with 30 TDs in 1964.) It should go without saying, but we’ll do it anyway, that this was only the Chiefs 10th game of the season. Somehow, the electric, MVP shoo-in is six touchdowns behind Peyton Manning’s record 55-touchdown pace of 2013, which only further proves how amazing that season was.

5. It took some missed field goals by Tampa’s Chandler Catanzaro to keep it alive, but on Sunday the Redskins extended one of the more unbelievable streaks in NFL history. In Washington’s six wins, the team has never trailed. In their three losses, they’ve never had a lead. The team that scores first has never relinquished their lead. How rare is it for a team to make it nine games without a single lead change? It’s been 64 years since the odd feat was accomplished, coincidentally by the same Redskins franchise. The difference that year was that the ‘Skins went 2-7 and usually got down so quickly that a lead change was never on the table. This year, Washington has outscored opponents by a single point, making the lack of flip-flop games all the more surprising.

Full List Here

By: Chris Chase

Alex Smith Traded To Redskins

Written Charean Williams at ProFootballTalk.com

Alex Smith doesn’t have to wonder about his future any longer, and Washington no longer has to wonder who its quarterback will be in 2018.

The Chiefs reached an agreement to trade Smith to Washington, Terez Paylor of the Kansas City Star reports. There is no word on the compensation the Chiefs will receive.

Although the trade cannot be consummated until the first day of the league year, which begins March 14, Paylor reports the sides have agreed to the deal.

Smith was entering the final year of his deal, with a cap number of $20.6 million for 2018. The Chiefs will save $17 million on their cap.

It paves the way for Patrick Mahomes to take over as the starting quarterback in Kansas City. It also assures that Kirk Cousins will enter free agency after Washington used the franchise tag on him in consecutive years.

Giants Somehow Beat Chiefs In OT

Written by the AP at USA Today.com

 After finally winning a game at home, the New York Giants just might have a say in who makes the playoffs.

The Chiefs found that out Sunday as the Giants shook off weeks of turmoil and speculation that second-year coach Ben McAdoo might be on the way out and beat AFC West-leading Kansas 12-9 on a 23-yard field goal by struggling rookie placekicker Aldrick Rosas with 1:54 left in overtime.

Roger Lewis Jr. set up the game winner with a spectacular 32-yard catch after being pulling to the ground by cornerback Phillip Gaines on a fourth-and-5 play.

Had he not caught it, flags flew for pass interference.

The win was totally unexpected, considering the Giants (2-8) were accused of quitting in one-sided losses to the Rams and the then-winless 49ers in the past two weeks.

After giving up 82 points in those losses, they held the high-powered Chiefs offense to a season-low point total in sending Andy Reid’s team to its fourth loss in five games after opening the season with five straight wins.

The Giants intercepted three passes, including two by Alex Smith, who had only one in his first nine games. Steve Spagnuolo’s unit limited the Chiefs to 3 of 11 on third down.

“Definitely, a big relief,” said Giants safety Landon Collins , who had a game-high 14 tackles and an interception. “It was a big win. We have some pressure off our shoulder. We still have pressure, but to play a team like the way we did is awesome.”

The Giants have some big games coming up in the NFC East, with a road game on Thanksgiving at Washington and then home matchups against Philadelphia, Dallas and Washington in December.

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Cowboys Beat Chiefs To Show They Still Got It

Written by Michael Beller at SI.com

Three thoughts from the Cowboys’ 28–17 win over the Chiefs.

1. The Cowboys came up with their best defensive performance of the season.The Chiefs entered Week 9 third in the league in both total offense at 377.9 yards per game and scoring at 29.5 points per game. Coming into this game, Alex Smith had thrown for 2,181 yards, 8.42 yards per attempt and 16 touchdowns against zero interceptions. Kareem Hunt was first in the NFL with 763 rushing yards, and among backs with at least 100 carries, tops at 5.23 yards per carry.

The Cowboys forced that offense into one of its worst games of the season—and iced the game by picking off Smith, his first interception of the season. Hunt ran for just 37 yards on nine carries, and totaled just 61 yards from scrimmage. They had trouble with Travis Kelce, but they did their job by limiting Hunt and Tyreek Hill (for the most part). With Dak Prescott controlling the action on the other side of the ball, that was more than enough.

2. Cause for concern in Kansas City? Four weeks ago, the Chiefs were the toast of the NFL. They were 5–0—the only undefeated team in the NFL—and in total command of the AFC West. The latter hasn’t changed, but their primacy in the AFC has. The Chiefs have lost three of their last four games, falling to 6–3 with their bye ahead in Week 10. Their losses have come against two teams we know are good—the Steelers and Cowboys—and a third, the Raiders, that remains in the playoff hunt. Pending the outcome of the Sunday night game between the Raiders and Dolphins, the Chiefs will be up by either two games or 2.5 games in the AFC West, so they remain in control of the division. For the first time all season, though, they are looking up at two teams in the AFC, with the Patriots and Steelers half a game ahead of them in the standings. Home field advantage is crucial in the NFL, and the Chiefs enjoy one of the strongest such advantages in the NFL. They’ll have a much better chance to put the playoff disappointments of the Smith/Andy Reid era behind them if they’re playing at home in the Divisional Round. That possibility is in doubt for the first time all season. They’re upcoming schedule, however, is favorable. After the bye, they visit the Giants, host the bills, and then head back to New Jersey for a game with the Jets.

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Chiefs Beat Broncos, Turnovers The Issue

Written by Will Brinson at CBS Sports.com

The irony of the Broncos’ run to Super Bowl 50 was it happened despite Peyton Manning, not because of him. Manning shattered records for Denver when he was playing at his second peak, post neck surgery, but outside of three incredible years from No. 18, Denver has had a quarterback problem under John Elway. That was exacerbated on Monday night, when Trevor Siemian and the Broncos offense sputtered against the Chiefs and wasted another impressive effort from Denver’s defense.

Siemian, somehow, was not benched by Vance Joseph in the ugly effort, which dropped the Broncos to 3-4. Meanwhile, the Chiefs (6-2) are in control of the AFC West and in contention for the No. 1 seed in the AFC, tying them with New England and Pittsburgh.

Elway is not opposed to making drastic maneuvers. After Monday, it feels like the Broncos need one. Siemian looked good through the first few weeks of the season, but he has cratered.

His first pick was an inexplicable shorty to Marcus Peters, whom he probably shouldn’t be targeting in the first place.

His second pick was a wobbly arm punt.

And his final pick of the night was one of the worst decision/throw combos you’ll see. Running and throwing across your body the other way is dangerous in high school football. It’s suicide in the NFL.

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Marshawn Lynch Ejected From Raiders-Chiefs Game

Written by Paul Gutierrez at ESPN.com

Marshawn Lynch was ejected from the Oakland Raiders’ 31-30 win against the Kansas City Chiefs midway through the second quarter Thursday night for making contact with an official.

Lynch ran off the sideline and into a scrum after Chiefs cornerback Marcus Peters hit Raiders quarterback Derek Carr late, drawing a flag for a personal foul. Several Raiders offensive linemen went after Peters, an Oakland native and close friend of Lynch.

Peters showed up for the game wearing a Beast Mode sweatshirt, which is Lynch’s apparel line.

Lynch, who had two carries for 9 yards before the ejection, bumped line judge Julian Mapp in the chest and then grabbed the official by the jersey before letting go and tending to Peters.

“I was disappointed he ran out because I knew we had a 15-yard penalty and we’d be in good shape,” Raiders coach Jack Del Rio said. “I told him you can’t leave the bench like that. That was about it. Next thing I knew, he was being tossed. The referee told me he had actually put his hands on him.”

Physical contact with an official carries a fine of $30,387. If the NFL suspends Lynch for coming off the bench to join the altercation, it would cost him a game check of $79,411.

Lynch was in the locker room to congratulate his teammates after the win but didn’t speak to reporters. He and Peters were spotted together on the BART (Bay Area Rapid Transit) after the game.

“I don’t have any problem with Marcus coming in and hitting me. He knows that. I told him, ‘I got no issue. Just play ball,’ ” Carr said. “Obviously, Marshawn came out and did his thing. You never want a guy to get kicked out. That stinks. But just from knowing him, I know that he was out there just taking care of us.”

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