The All-Time Super Bowl Greats Lineup

In 1967, the Green Bay Packers defeated the Kansas City Chiefs to become the NFL’s first ever Super Bowl Champion. Bart Starr, Jim Taylor, and Max McGee combined to form one of the deadliest trio in Super Bowl history as they beat up the Chiefs, along with a dominate Packers defense, to win 35-10.

That was just the beginning.

Since the Packers victory in 1967, 20 teams have won the Lombardi. Only four teams have never even been to the big show. (Cleveland Browns, Houston Texans, Jacksonville Jaguars, Detroit Lions)

Can you imagine what the lineup would look like if you examined every team from every Super Bowl and built the perfect team? Who would make the cut?

We are going to start with the Head Coach because what good is a lineup if you have no one calling the plays and managing the sidelines? We’re also going to do our best to avoid naming Patriots to the team because screw those guys.

Head Coach – Vince Lombardi, Packers

Super Bowls – 2 (I, II)

NFL Championships – 4 (1956, 1961, 1962, 1965)

We could spit out facts and stats to prove the point we want to make. But that is just plain easy.

Ask yourself this question instead, who is the Super Bowl trophy named after?

QB – Joe Montana, San Francisco 49ers

Championships – 4 (XVI, XIX, XXIII, XXIV)

MVPs – 3 (XVI, XIX, XXIV)

Passer Rating – 127.83 (SB Record)

Passing Yards – 1,142

Passing TDs – 11 (SB Record)

INTs – 0 (SB Record)

Rushing TDs – 2

There has never been a more efficient player in Super Bowl history than Joe Montana. He is the definition of winning. He led the 49ers to the playoffs in 10 consecutive seasons from 1982 to 1991. During those ten years, he won 4 Super Bowl’s, 3 Super Bowl MVPs (Record), and led the 49ers to a come from behind win over the Bengals with a 10 yard TD pass to John Taylor, otherwise known as “The Catch”. Selecting Montana gives us the added bonus of pissing off Tom Brady fans.

RB – Franco Harris, Pittsburgh Steelers

Championships – 4 (IX, X, XIII, XIV)

MVPs – 1 (IX)

Rushing Attempts – 101 (SB Record)

Rushing Yards – 354 (SB Record)

Rushing TDs – 4

He was a bruising back standing over six feet tall and weighing north of 225 pounds. He was the reason Pittsburgh won their first ever playoff game thanks to one of the most amazing plays of all time, “The Immaculate Reception”. It was not only his catch and score that led Pittsburgh to the victory, he had 160 total yards including the only Steeler touchdown of the day. He would later be a part of a Pittsburgh team that won four Super Bowls in six seasons, an NFL record.

RB – Emmitt Smith, Dallas Cowboys

Championships – 3 (XXVII, XXVIII, XXX)

MVPs – 1 (XXVIII)

Rushing Yards – 289

Rushing TDs – 5 (SB Record)

We have a chance to build the perfect roster of Super Bowl champions and Emmitt Smith falls into our laps? The greatest NFL RB of all time owns the NFL record for most career rushing yards, rushing TDs, and most 100 yard rushing games. He played in 3 Super Bowls and ran for over 100 yards twice. The argument shouldn’t be whether or not he makes the team, it should be whether or not we need a second RB.

WR – Jerry Rice, San Francisco 49ers

By Thomas Delatte

Complete Line Up

All-time Super Bowl QB rankings: Tom Brady tops 61-man list

Five Super Bowls ago, the dominant pregame storyline centered around whether Peyton Manning was poised to become the greatest quarterback of all time.
Tom Brady’s preposterous stretch since then, including four more Super Bowl bids, two huge fourth-quarter comebacks and one MVP award all but settled that particular debate. Returning to the big game with this particular Patriots team almost feels like running up the score.

Brady’s place atop the quarterback mountain stands in stark contrast to the stature of his Super Bowl LIII counterpart, Jared Goff, who will be a few months younger than Brady was back in February of 2002, when the Patriots dynasty was born against the Rams. But where does Goff stack up against other Super Bowl starters overall?

To figure that out, I combed through the resumes of all 61 Super Bowl starting quarterbacks, including Goff. It’s important to note that for players like Johnny Unitas and Bart Starr, who started Super Bowls but whose peak years came before the Super Bowl era, I considered their entire careers, not just what they did from 1966 onward. I ranked all quarterbacks based on career achievements, with regular-season excellence, All-Pro/Pro Bowl appearances and seasons as top-five and top-10 players at the position carrying more weight than just Super Bowl success. (Spoiler: Jim Plunkett did not have a better career than Dan Marino. Sorry.)

The good news for Goff: He’s already ahead of a few Super Bowl starters. At 24 years old with the biggest game of his life ahead, he has a long runway to improve his resume.

To the rankings!

G.O.A.T. pasture

1) Tom Brady (Super Bowl record: 5-3 with Patriots)

2) Johnny Unitas (1-0 with Colts)

3) Joe Montana (4-0 with 49ers)

4) Peyton Manning (1-1 with Colts; 1-1 with Broncos)

5) Dan Marino (0-1 with Dolphins)

6) Brett Favre (1-1 with Packers)

These are the six men who could conceivably have an argument as being the greatest ever, although the breadth of Brady’s career now makes it difficult for the rest of the group. The first nine seasons of Brady’s career — which included three titles and an undefeated regular season — now look like an appetizer to Brady’s dominant Gronk-era peak.

It’s impossible to truly compare across eras because the game has changed so much, but Unitas (who played from 1956 to 1973) edges out Montana (1979-1994) and Manning (1998-2015) for the No. 2 spot because Johnny U was so clearly the best of his era and a transformative figure for the sport. Unitas collected three MVPs and five first-team All-Pro nods, and he displayed a sneaky statistical dominance compared to his competition.

Manning ultimately overwhelms Marino and Favre with individual honors and consistency. He was so rarely outside the league’s top-three quarterbacks during a career that included five MVPs. Marino is probably the best pure passer of this group. He was never supported with a top-10 running game, and he rarely played with a good defense. He shouldn’t suffer too much, historically speaking, just because of Don Shula’s personnel decisions. Favre has perhaps the strangest resume. He combines a brilliant peak with three consecutive MVPs and a career famous for its durability with some lesser efficiency stats than the rest of the tier. Still, there’s not that much separating any of these guys.

The best second tier ever

7) Steve Young (1-0 with 49ers)

8) Aaron Rodgers (1-0 with Packers)

9) John Elway (2-3 with Broncos)

10) Roger Staubach (2-2 with Cowboys)

11) Drew Brees (1-0 with Saints)

12) Bart Starr (2-0 with Packers)

It’s wild how similar the resumes of Young and Rodgers look. They both had to wait before taking over for all-time greats who just happen to be in the tier above. They each have two MVPs. They were both as athletic as any top quarterback who has ever played. Young’s teams went 94-49 in his starts, from 1985 to 1999. Rodgers’ teams have gone 100-57-1. Young gets the slight edge for now because his seven-year peak ranks with that of any quarterback who has ever played, but it’s only a matter of time before Rodgers moves up.

Elway was a physical marvel, won an MVP and earned three second-team All-Pro nods in his career (1983-1998), but his passing numbers (3,217 passing yards, 19 touchdowns and 14 picks per year), when adjusted for his era, don’t stack up with the rest of the top 10. Staubach is a great “What if?” because he didn’t become a full-time starter until he was 29 years old. He’s still the consensus best quarterback of the 1970s and led the league in passer rating four times. He probably gets downgraded too much for the era he played in. Starr, who has a reputation for being a “winner” of the ’60s and early Super Bowl era without generating great stats actually has … pretty great stats. So does Brees, who just turned 40 — and just completed one of his best NFL seasons.

In (or should be in) the Hall of Fame

13) Fran Tarkenton (0-3 with Vikings)

14) Ben Roethlisberger (2-1 with Steelers)

15) Troy Aikman (3-0 with Cowboys)

16) Terry Bradshaw (4-0 with Steelers)

17) Joe Namath (1-0 with Jets)

18) Bob Griese (2-1 with Dolphins)

19) Len Dawson (1-1 with Chiefs)

20) Jim Kelly (0-4 with Bills)

21) Kurt Warner (1-1 with Rams; 0-1 with Cardinals)

22) Ken Anderson (0-1 with Bengals)

23) Ken Stabler (1-0 with Raiders)

Like Brees, Tarkenton was an undersized, undervalued but consistent star with an incredibly long run of statistical dominance. Roethlisberger has been a top-five quarterback for the better part of his career, especially after his second Super Bowl triumph (following the 2008 season). Aikman’s peak (1991-96) was impressive, but unfortunately too short. Bradshaw wasn’t great in the seasons preceding his first two Super Bowl triumphs (1975 and ’76), but he wound up being a league MVP and finishing in the top five in yards per attempt five times. Namath gets extra credit for his impact on the game, although it’s worth noting Griese had three more Pro Bowl appearances (eight to Namath’s five), one more All-Pro nod (two to one) and far more seasons in the top five in yards per attempt. The offensive line and running game help, but Griese deserves some legacy love!

Dawson was the best passer in a pass-happy league, leading the AFL in passer rating for five straight years (1964-68). Kelly, like Aikman, had a brilliant peak that wasn’t quite as long as that of some others listed here. Warner had a singular career, starting late before winning two MVPs and leading two different teams to the Super Bowl. Anderson still should be considered for the Hall of Fame, as he was the rare player to win MVP, Comeback Player of the Year and the Walter Payton Man of the Year award. He led the league in passer rating four times and earned a first-team All-Pro selection and two second-team nods, which is more than plenty of the names above him. Stabler finally got into the Hall in 2016, unfortunately after his passing.

Fun to watch

24) Donovan McNabb (0-1 with Eagles)

25) Boomer Esiason (0-1 with Bengals)

26) Daryle Lamonica (0-1 with Raiders)

27) Matt Ryan (0-1 with Falcons)

28) Earl Morrall (0-1 with Colts)

29) Eli Manning (2-0 with Giants)

30) Steve McNair (0-1 with Titans)

31) Russell Wilson (1-1 with Seahawks)

32) Rich Gannon (0-1 with Raiders)

McNabb was a top-10 quarterback for nearly all of his career, very often in the top five. I’m surprised he doesn’t get more Hall of Fame consideration. Esiason won an MVP (1988) and led the league in yards per attempt in that season and 1986. Lamonica was someone I didn’t fully appreciate until this exercise. While he was fattening up on a soft AFL, he made five Pro Bowls and nabbed two AFL Player of the Year awards. He finished his career 66-16-6 as a starter! Ryan has a number of seasons as a top-10 quarterback, although his MVP campaign of 2016 stands out as an anomaly.

Full List

By: Gregg Rosenthal

Joe Montana Believes in the Healing Power of Marijuana

Another former elite level professional athlete has come out in support of medical marijuana as a therapeutic treatment for pain. Hall of Fame quarterback Joe Montana, who played most of his career in California for the San Francisco 49ers, has joined a growing community of retired athletes speaking out about their cannabis-aided healing regimen.

Montana told Playboy Magazine, “Legalization is picking up steam on a global level and I feel like now is the time to spread information about the curing capabilities of this plant. As with any medicine, increased accessibility comes with the need for education.”

Increased focus on pain relief methodology among the NFL and other professional sports leagues comes after much scrutiny of the way these businesses prioritize profits over healthcare — physical and mental. The NFL, which has been inundated with criticism in recent years for their mishandling of the league’s concussion crisis and the resulting long-term damage it can cause to players, has been notoriously behind in their acceptance of marijuana research.

The league caved somewhat and offered to help fund a study being conducted by the NFL Players Association, the union that represents current and former players in the league, but their assistance was declined.

Playboy spoke to eight different former NFL player about their thoughts on cannabis, including some who were trailblazers on the medical marijuana front, like Ricky Williams and Eugene Monroe, as well as other players like Montana who hadn’t spoken publicly about their use of the plant before.

In a 2016 interview with USA Today, the four-time Super Bowl champion, who retired in 1994, ran down the laundry list of physical ailments he suffers from on a daily basis. From arthritis in his hands to nerve damage in his eye, Montana feels the effects of football everywhere in his body.

“Unfortunately,” Montana said, “most of us leave this game with things that linger.” Montana was sacked over 350 times in his professional career, brutal hits that leave their mark long after his playing days were over. “My hands have been, oh my gosh, in the middle of the night they hurt like crazy. They kept saying I’ll need a knee replacement when I can’t walk. I can’t really run or do much with it.”

“After my first back surgery, what kind of compounds things, is my sciatic nerve has been damaged,” Montana added. “So the muscles along my sciatic nerve into my left foot have been numb since ’86.”

Players of Montana’s stature speaking out about their use of medical marijuana as an alternative to prescribed painkillers is a huge step in ending the opioid epidemic among athletes. A 2012 study estimated that over 52 percent of former NFL players used opioids while they played professional football, and 71 percent of them reported misusing the drugs. Many of them continue misusing once their playing days are over, as the rate of former NFL players that use opioids is three times greater than the general population.

By Duke London

Original Article

Brady Doesn’t Think He’s The GOAT

Written by Jeremy Bergman at NFL.com

On the heels of Tom Brady Appreciation Week, and in the midst of Tom Brady Adulation Offseason, the Patriots quarterback continues to be lauded, often rightly, as the greatest of all time. Or as one video game enterprise put it: the G.O.A.T.

But Brady doesn’t see it that way. Not even after completing the greatest comeback in Super Bowl, and arguably professional football, history.

In a wide-ranging interview with ESPN’s Ian O’Connor, Brady brushed off talk that he had surpassed his boyhood hero, former 49ers legend Joe Montana, as the greatest quarterback and football player in the game’s history.

“I don’t agree with that,” he told O’Connor, “and I’ll tell you why. I know myself as a player. I’m really a product of what I’ve been around, who I was coached by, what I played against, in the era I played in. I really believe if a lot of people were in my shoes they could accomplish the same kinds of things. So I’ve been very fortunate. … I don’t ever want to be the weak link.”

It’s quite a humble stance from a five-time Super Bowl champion, four-time Super Bowl MVP and two-time MVP who’s quarterbacked for a decade and a half the greatest football dynasty this league has ever known. But it’s one we’ve come to expect from Brady, who prefers to chase greatness, not profess it.

Instead, his eyes are now set on another legend of American sports: six-time NBA champion and brand master Michael Jordan.

“I was in awe of Michael Jordan,” Brady added, “and I still am in awe of what he was and what he meant. … He was such an effortless player. He put a lot of effort in, but there’s an art and a beauty to the way he played the game. That was a very inspiring thing.”

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